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"The mind does not take its complexion from the skin."

- Frederick Douglass (via specialnights)
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"The children of children are trapped by adults, who fail them, then jail them to hide the results."

- Oscar Brown Jr (via specialnights)
Source: specialnights
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ikantenggelem:

Nokia Treasure Tag: never lose your valuables again

This looks like Tile app

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ikantenggelem:

Comic crossover art :3 Nice~~~

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afro-dominicano:

Geophysicist Estella Atekwana

Estella Atekwana grew up in Cameroon. “My parents very much wanted me to do medicine,” she writes.

“So I got into sciences with that intention. However, I took a course in geology in high school and the teacher indicated that geology was not for girls. I was challenged then to demonstrate that girls could do geology and perform the same as boys or even better. I ended up with the science award that year in chemistry, biology, and geology.”

Image 1: Professor Estella Atekwana teaches Potential Field Methods at Oklahoma State University via Training Tomorrow’s Geoscientists

Image 2: University of Oklahoma seismologist Katie Keranen and Oklahoma State University geophysicist Estella Atekwana install a seismometer following a series of earlier quakes. (Shannon Dulin) via Fracking Spurred Biggest Earthquake Yet

She moved to North America to study the geosciences, earning a bachelor’s and master’s in geology from Howard University and a Ph.D. from Dalhousie University in Canada. “Today, they call me Doctor and that’s fine with my parents.”

She is now Sun Chair at Oklahoma State University, where she is a leader in the new field of biogeophysics [Biogeophysics is a subdiscipline of geophysics concerned with how plants, microbial activity and other organisms alter geologic materials and affect geophysical signatures.].

(via scienceyoucanlove)

Source: afro-dominicano
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scienceyoucanlove:

The HeLa Genome: An Agreement on Privacy and Access

The field of genomics has equipped scientists and clinicians with powerful tools to study the role that our genetic blueprint plays in our health.  Increasingly, such knowledge is enabling health care professionals to diagnose, treat, and even prevent diseases more precisely based on each person’s unique genetic profile. However, the very thing that gives these tools their beneficial power—the ability to identify an individual’s disease risks—also raises questions about maintaining anonymity of research participants. The issue rose to the surface of public consciousness in March 2013 when researchers sequenced the genome of the first and most widely used human cell line, called HeLa, and posted the data online.

The circumstances surrounding the HeLa cell line are unusual because the donor of the original cells—the late Henrietta Lacks—had been identified in scientific journals and eventually made famous by a BBC documentary, newspaper articles, and a bestselling book.  As a result, Ms. Lacks and many of her descendents are known by name to millions of people. It quickly became apparent that the publicly posted HeLa genome data and what it might reveal about Ms. Lacks’ disease risks could have implications for her descendants.  Consequently, the data were removed from public view.

Because of the unique concerns posed by the HeLa genome data, NIH and the Lacks family worked together to develop a solution that allows researchers access to this valuable resource while respecting the wishes of the family.  That historic agreement and the collaborative discussions that made it possible are outlined by me and Kathy L. Hudson, Ph.D., NIH Deputy Director for Science, Outreach, and Policy, in the Nature Comment below.

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Source: scienceyoucanlove
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scienceyoucanlove:

Chitons have the hardest teeth in the world. The humble molluscs survive by scraping algae from rocks with their blue metallic teeth made out of magnetite, an iron oxide used in electronics and medical devices. 

Scientists are trying to decipher how chitons synthesise magnetite, as that could be the key for producing tough materials in the lab.

Read more: http://bit.ly/19outZm via NewScientist

Image: Lyle Gordon/Northwestern University

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scienceyoucanlove:

Printing Life - 
3-D printing allows tissue engineers to fabricate more-complex shapes and to precisely mix biological materials. For the full version of this infographic, head to: http://bit.ly/1fXjrl3

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Source: scienceyoucanlove